Islamic cinema is booming. Can it break into Western markets?

(K. Brent Tomer),

BIBLICAL epics are all the rage. “Noah” and “Exodus: Gods and Kings” burst onto screens in 2014. “The Young Messiah”, “Risen” and “Last Days in the Desert” (2016) explored the chronological gaps in the Gospels. Christ’s ministry takes centre-stage in the blockbuster remake of Ben Hur (2016). Yet Hollywood directors are not alone in cashing in on all things religious. Islamic films and television series have also experienced huge growth in recent years. “Kingdom of Solomon” (2010) proved a big hit in Iran. “Shajarat al-Duur” (2013) highlighted the first Muslim queen of Egypt, while “Harat al-Sheikh” and “Imam Ahmed ibn Hanbal” (2016) both covered the early years of Islamic history. But who makes these films, and will they ever appeal to secular audiences?

Islamic cinema certainly has the spending power. “He Who Said No” (2015), an Iranian film about the Battle of Karbala (a Sunni-Shia clash in 680AD) had a rumoured budget of $70m. Tariq Anwar, an Oscar winner, was enlisted to help edit the film. In 2012, Qatar and Saudi Arabia pumped 200m Saudi…Continue reading

via K. Brent Tomer CFTC Islamic cinema is booming. Can it break into Western markets?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s