Netflix’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events” is vivacious, faithful and detailed

(K. Brent Tomer),

“THIS show will wreck your evening, your home life and your day.” From the very first discouragement, it is clear that Netflix’s adaptation of “A Series of Unfortunate Events”—a set of 13 books about the miserable lives of three orphans—is both highly consistent with the original tales and willing to make some bold changes. At no point during Daniel Handler’s novels do we see the face of Lemony Snicket, his enigmatic, pessimistic narrator, which is obscured in every illustration; the television series opens with Snicket (played by Patrick Warburton) revealing himself by the light of a match. Yet any fans that are irked by this immediate transgression will soon realise how closely the screenplay follows the original text. Mr Warburton’s first words, warning the viewer not to proceed with the ghastly history of the Baudelaire siblings, are lifted straight from the book. The majority of his lines are verbatim and almost every moment in the plot is included.

This fidelity is made possible by the format. The first attempt to render the stories on the screen was a 2004 film featuring Jim Carrey as Count Olaf: a villainous and fraudulent dramatist who is…Continue reading

via K. Brent Tomer CFTC Netflix’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events” is vivacious, faithful and detailed

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