“The Glass Castle” deals in the contradictions of human nature

(K. Brent Tomer),

REAL LIFE is full of conflicts and dualities. Life, as often imagined by Hollywood, is not, which makes “The Glass Castle” a tricky bit of source material. In her bestselling memoir from 2005, Jeannette Walls recalled her fraught relationship with her father, a whimsical narcissist who both delighted his family with imaginative flights of fancy and terrorised them with alcohol-fuelled fits of rage. He is both hero and villain, a source of tenderness and abuse. The book was a moving meditation on the naivety of youth and the wisdom of age. 

Destin Daniel Cretton, the director and co-writer of a new adaptation, tells the story in two timelines. The first is a portrait of a chaotic childhood. When we first meet Jeannette (played marvellously as a youngster by Ella Anderson), she and her siblings believe they are on a glorious adventure helmed by a wise and wondrous captain. Rex (Woody Harrelson) moves his family from town to town without warning—he struggles to hold down a job—and the children are young enough to believe his…Continue reading

via K. Brent Tomer CFTC “The Glass Castle” deals in the contradictions of human nature

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